This was posted 14 hours ago. It has 1 note.
This was posted 17 hours ago. It has 1 note. .
lightspeedsound:

elindigenazi:

ralphieisadreamer:

snarkbender:

sofriel:

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

gadaboutgreen:

did-you-kno:

Source

Uh duh.

What was that?
POCS were thriving and had expansive civilizations BEFORE white people came,colonized everything, and “discovered them”?
Oh…

Go read the source article. And if you haven’t, go read “1491” by Charles Mann. Indigenous people in the Amazon actually found a way to farm that instead of wearing out the soil, actually IMPROVED it with extensive farming. It’s called terra preta and no one has been able to replicate it (not even living indigenous people), and if it were to become replicable it could have enormous impact on agriculture worldwide. #indigenoustechftw
Charles Mann states that for a long time (and still today) outsiders have thought of Amazonian Indian people as “remnants” of the most “primitive” state of humanity, when in fact evidence increasingly points to the idea that modern Amazonian indigenous ways of life are the result of massive upheaval in the face colonizing disease, warfare, land theft, and general genocide. That, effectively, modern Amazonian indigenous people are living in the aftermath of what probably looked a lot like an apocalypse to them.
Which, well, no duh. 

are you sure it wasn’t some alien technology that let them farm sustainably before the White Men came & showed them how to civilised?

White people theworld didnt start with your invasion

I also read that the Amazon is just a giant garden. In other words, IT’S MAN MADE!!!! THE PEOPLE CREATED A STABLE ECOSYSTEM!!!! THEY WERE FUCKING GENIUSES. Read it here and here. 

lmao only white ppl are surprised that civilizationwas doing quite fine before them, thank you.

I love how ceramics are a major factor in the research:
Archaeology in the Amazon is not easy. Few rock formations meant that any buildings had to rely on wood. Left untended - or abandoned - they would soon be quickly swallowed by the jungle. 
 So those scientists who go today rely on new technologies to unearth the past, from satellite imagery to ground-penetrating radar and remote sensors to find ceramics. 
 Oyuela-Caycedo, the University of Florida archaeologist, and Nigel Smith, a geographer and palm tree expert, have yet to use these tools here, a short boat ride from this town, San Martin de Samiria. Instead they have been trying to get a feel for the land beneath their feet. 
 On a recent morning, using a soil coring device, Oyuela-Caycedo extracted a heavy, black dirt in a spot he calls Salvavidas, or Lifesaver. It was terra preta, black, nutrient-rich, as good for agriculture as the soil in Iowa. 
 “It is the best soil that you can find in the Amazon,” said Oyuela-Caycedo, who wore netting over his face to protect him from mosquitoes. “You don’t find it in natural form.” 
 Three feet deep here, and stretching nearly 100 acres, this terra preta could have fed at least 5,000 people. The forests here were also carefully managed in other ways, Oyuela-Caycedo believes, with the Indians planting semi-domesticated trees that bore all manner of fruit, such as macambo, sapote and jungle avocados. 
 Bits of colorful ceramics - matching that found elsewhere in the Amazon - seem to show that those who lived here were the Omaguas, the same people Gaspar de Carvajal encountered nearly 500 years before. 
 There is no doubt, Oyuela-Caycedo said, that the Omaguas faced hardship: insects, poisonous snakes, poor soil. But their environment had vast potential, he said, and the Omaguas exploited it before their civilization was brought to heel by disease. 
 “The only thing they had to do was to change and transform the landscape,” Oyuela-Caycedo said. “And that is what they did.”

Source

lightspeedsound:

elindigenazi:

ralphieisadreamer:

snarkbender:

sofriel:

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

gadaboutgreen:

did-you-kno:

Source

Uh duh.

What was that?

POCS were thriving and had expansive civilizations BEFORE white people came,colonized everything, and “discovered them”?

Oh…

Go read the source article. And if you haven’t, go read “1491” by Charles Mann. Indigenous people in the Amazon actually found a way to farm that instead of wearing out the soil, actually IMPROVED it with extensive farming. It’s called terra preta and no one has been able to replicate it (not even living indigenous people), and if it were to become replicable it could have enormous impact on agriculture worldwide. #indigenoustechftw

Charles Mann states that for a long time (and still today) outsiders have thought of Amazonian Indian people as “remnants” of the most “primitive” state of humanity, when in fact evidence increasingly points to the idea that modern Amazonian indigenous ways of life are the result of massive upheaval in the face colonizing disease, warfare, land theft, and general genocide. That, effectively, modern Amazonian indigenous people are living in the aftermath of what probably looked a lot like an apocalypse to them.

Which, well, no duh. 

are you sure it wasn’t some alien technology that let them farm sustainably before the White Men came & showed them how to civilised?

White people theworld didnt start with your invasion

I also read that the Amazon is just a giant garden. In other words, IT’S MAN MADE!!!! THE PEOPLE CREATED A STABLE ECOSYSTEM!!!! THEY WERE FUCKING GENIUSES. Read it here and here

lmao only white ppl are surprised that civilizationwas doing quite fine before them, thank you.

I love how ceramics are a major factor in the research:

Archaeology in the Amazon is not easy. Few rock formations meant that any buildings had to rely on wood. Left untended - or abandoned - they would soon be quickly swallowed by the jungle.

So those scientists who go today rely on new technologies to unearth the past, from satellite imagery to ground-penetrating radar and remote sensors to find ceramics.

Oyuela-Caycedo, the University of Florida archaeologist, and Nigel Smith, a geographer and palm tree expert, have yet to use these tools here, a short boat ride from this town, San Martin de Samiria. Instead they have been trying to get a feel for the land beneath their feet.

On a recent morning, using a soil coring device, Oyuela-Caycedo extracted a heavy, black dirt in a spot he calls Salvavidas, or Lifesaver. It was terra preta, black, nutrient-rich, as good for agriculture as the soil in Iowa.

“It is the best soil that you can find in the Amazon,” said Oyuela-Caycedo, who wore netting over his face to protect him from mosquitoes. “You don’t find it in natural form.”

Three feet deep here, and stretching nearly 100 acres, this terra preta could have fed at least 5,000 people. The forests here were also carefully managed in other ways, Oyuela-Caycedo believes, with the Indians planting semi-domesticated trees that bore all manner of fruit, such as macambo, sapote and jungle avocados.

Bits of colorful ceramics - matching that found elsewhere in the Amazon - seem to show that those who lived here were the Omaguas, the same people Gaspar de Carvajal encountered nearly 500 years before.

There is no doubt, Oyuela-Caycedo said, that the Omaguas faced hardship: insects, poisonous snakes, poor soil. But their environment had vast potential, he said, and the Omaguas exploited it before their civilization was brought to heel by disease.

“The only thing they had to do was to change and transform the landscape,” Oyuela-Caycedo said. “And that is what they did.”

Source

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 20,016 notes. .
Out my kitchen window

Out my kitchen window

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 3 notes. .
This was posted 1 day ago. It has 0 notes. .

Selection 1.8: Anti-Imperialist Resolutions, Black Citizens of Boston, from The Philippines Reader: A History of Colonialism, Neocolonialism, Dictatorship, and Resistance, edited by Daniel B. Schirmer & Stephen Rosskamm Shalom

White middle class professionals provided the main leadership of the anti-imperialist movement, but it gained support from farmers (for whom William Jennings Bryan especially spoke), from labor, from recent immigrant groups notably the Irish and the Germans, and from blacks. Of all these, perhaps it was the black anti-imperialists who identified most closely with the Filipinos. They saw themselves like the Filipinos as victims of U.S. racism and racist policies. Evidence of this sympathy was to be seen in the opposition of most of the black press to McKinley’s Philippine policies and in the unusual rate of desertion of black troops serving in the Philippines, some of whom went over to fight on the Filipino side. On July 17, 1899, in anticipation of the coming presidential election, a meeting of Boston blacks was held to further the influence and organization of anti-imperialist sentiment in the black communities of the nation. This meeting adopted the following resolutions.

Source: The Boston Post, July 18, 1899.

_____

Resolved, That the colored people of Boston in meeting assembled desire to enter their solemn protest against the present unjustified invasion by American soldiers in the Philippine Islands.

Resolved, That, while the rights of colored citizens in the South, sacredly guaranteed them by the amendment of the Constitution, are shamefully disregarded; and, while the frequent lynchings of negroes who are denied a civilized trial are a reproach to Republican government, the duty of the President and country is to reform these crying domestic wrongs and not to attempt the civilization of alien peoples by powder and shot.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the President of the United States and to the press.

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 2 notes.

trans/national

queerlibido:

repeat after me: 
1. our immigrant families are not just ‘homophobic’ they are also ‘colonized.’
2. our parents have histories, genders, and sexualities, too.
3. they are just as broken as we are (but we have the words — i mean the english — to say it)
4. the diaspora responds to racism with heteronormativity
5. trauma seeps through generations

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 180 notes.
rayjohnsonestate:

This text piece is verging on the asemic.

I read that as “verging on arsenic.”Also I think “asemic” describes my work well, especially when I’m trying to handwrite something I can’t say, something between Tagalog and English, between image and text.And also “Aldrin” is a compound used in pesticides.

rayjohnsonestate:

This text piece is verging on the asemic.

I read that as “verging on arsenic.”

Also I think “asemic” describes my work well, especially when I’m trying to handwrite something I can’t say, something between Tagalog and English, between image and text.

And also “Aldrin” is a compound used in pesticides.

This was posted 5 days ago. It has 20 notes. .
This was posted 6 days ago. It has 8 notes.
Friends saying hello to another friend who couldn’t be at the party.

Friends saying hello to another friend who couldn’t be at the party.

This was posted 6 days ago. It has 1 note. .